trial

October 23, 2017 – New evidence for the defense

Judge Bambiliya set a new hearing (the 11th) to Monday, October 23, at 10:00, to decide whether to agree to the presentation of new evidence by defense attorney Gaby Lasky.

At the same hearing a new date for the verdict will probably be announced.

See below a step-by-step description of the trial - with many links to detailed articles.

Dareen is already more than two years under detention... the first three month in different Israeli prisons and since then under house arrest.

October 17, 2017 - Date set for verdict postponed

Due to new evidence presented to the court – the date set for the verdict, October 17, was postponed.

The defense lawyer, Gaby Lasky, requested to present new evidence that disprove some of the claims of the prosecution and establish the case for discriminative enforcement. Only when these issues will be resolved we will have a new date for the verdict.

The Summaries

In the meantime, the prosecutor has already presented (on June 26) her written 43 pages summary, which repeats and stresses furiously all the original accusations. She even claims that the big differences between the translation of the poem that was done by an unqualified policeman and the professional translation presented by the defense prove that the defense’s translation is not reliable!

Now advocate Gaby Lasky is working on her summaries to disprove all the prosecution’s lies and distortions… It will not be ready before September and the trial will probably not be finished before Dareen will complete her second year of detention on October 11…

Update 26 June 2017

On April 27 Judge Bambiliya gave the prosecution 45 days to submit written summaries. They later asked for, and received, another 15 days extension. Now the extended period passed and they didn’t submit the summaries yet, not bothering even to ask for another extension.

The immediate result for Dareen Tatour of these delays is that her house detention – to which she was subjected “until the end of legal proceedings” – is prolonged even more. Now there is little chance that the trial will finish before the poet has lost her freedom for two full years. And this extended period of confinement and suffering will not be reduced from the “punishment” (up to 8 years imprisonment) that might be imposed on her by the court at the end of the trial.

Now lawyer friends tell me that this is nothing special against Dareen. Such delays are daily practice of the prosecution and many of the accused pay the price... Not much of condolences. 

The Trial: Step by Step

On October 11, 2015, Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour was arrested in a pre-dawn raid on her house in Reineh.

The Indictment

On November 2, 2015, she was indicted in the Magistrates’ Court in Nazareth for “incitement to violence” and “support of a terrorist organization”.

The indictment is all based on three publications by Tatour:

1) The poem “Resist My People, Resist Them” – which Tatour published in her Youtube channel and Facebook page. A distorted Hebrew translation of the poem, made by a policeman with no qualification in translation or literature, is fully cited in the indictment document.

2) A Facebook post mentioning that Islamic Jihad called for an intifada in the West Bank and later contains a call for intifada within the green line to support Muslim’s rights to pray in the Al-Aqsa mosque is the base for the accusation of “supporting a terrorist organization”. Clearly the reference to Islamic Jihad is just citing a news item and Tatour explained her call for intifada as a call for legitimate mass struggle.

3) The last publication mentioned in the indictment is composed of two pictures: A picture of Israa Abed (a women from Nazareth that was wrongly suspected as a terrorist attacker) lying on the floor of the Afula central bus station after she was shot by Israeli police and guards – posted as Tatour’s wallpaper on Facebook, and a small black picture with white Arabic writing “I am the next martyr”, that was her profile picture. The prosecution claims that by posting these two pictures together Tatour was inciting for violence. Tatour explained that the profile picture “I’m the next martyr” was first posted by her and by many activists after the burning alive of Palestinian teen Muhammad Abu-Khdeir in Jerusalem in June 2014. It was a protest at the killing of innocent Palestinians that was reused after the murder of Kheir Hamdan by Israeli police in Kafr Kana in November 2014. And she published the picture of Israa Abed after watching a video of her shooting and being sure that she was shot even though she didn’t attack anyone – a claim currently accepted by the Israeli authorities.

First hearing, April 13, 2016 – The police translator

In the first hearing of the trial, on April 13, 2016, the prosecutor chose to start presenting her case with the Hebrew translation of the “Resist” poem. For this purpose she brought the police translator, Warrant Officer Nissim Bishara. The veteran policeman testified in court that his qualification for translating the poem was his study of literature in high school and his love for the Arab language.

You can follow the links for a report in English about this hearing, or for a more detailed Hebrew report.

Second hearing, May 5, 2016 – Demonstration and closed doors

Before the second hearing on May 5, 2016, there was a solidarity vigil with Tatour in front of the Nazareth court. As a result there was more media attention and Haaretz wrote about the trial for the first time (in English and Hebrew).

Because of the vigil, many people, including some Arab Knesset members, came to attend the hearing. The judge didn’t like it and held the hearing beyond closed doors.

Another policeman gave evidence about details of Tatour’s interrogation. See a report here (and in Hebrew).

Third hearing, July 17, 2016 – Proving the Facebook

On the 3rd hearing on July 17, 2016, the prosecutor brought as witnesses Tatour’s best friend Samira and her young brother Ahmad to prove that her Facebook page belongs to her – a fact that she herself testified to repeatedly in her interrogations in the police.

The prosecutor also brought as a witness Rami Amer from Kafr Qasim, one of the organizers of the yearly commemoration of the Kafr Qasim massacre. They brought him to witness how and why he invited Tatour to read from her poems in the commemoration ceremony. Initially Tatour was interrogated about her participation in this commemoration as part of the accusations against her. Later the prosecutor tried to use it to prove that she is a famous poet, and for this reason her incitement constitutes severe danger to state security. In the court Amer explained that “the fact that I know her as a poet doesn’t mean that she is a known poet”.

You can see detailed reports about this hearing in Arabic and Hebrew.

Forth hearing, September 6, 2016 – Interrogating the interrogator

For this hearing Tatour’s lawyer Abed Fahoum made the not-so-common effort to go over the video that documented her interrogation by Officer Samer Khalil. He confronted the prosecutor witness with big gaps between what was recorded on the video and what was written in the interrogation’s protocol.

Finally the video proved, and the officer had to admit, that Tatour was forced to sign the protocol (written by Khalil in Hebrew, even though the interrogation was held in Arabic), without being allowed to read it, as she explicitly requested to do.

With this testimony the prosecution rested her case.

Tatour had to start her testimony on the same day, but the court failed to find a translator.

You can follow the link for a detailed report about this hearing (and in Hebrew)..

Fifth to seventh hearings, November 17 & 24, 2016 and January 26, 2017 – Tatour’s testimony

On November 17 the trial resume and Tatour had new lawyers, Gaby Lasky from Tel Aviv, accompanied by Nery Ramati from her office.

In her testimony Tatour admitted to posting all the publications that were attributed to her in their original Arabic form, but explained that the police translation distorted her words and that the police and prosecution distorted their meaning. She explained how all her publications were legitimate expression of protest against the crimes of the Israeli occupation and the settlers, and that all her calls for struggle are not meant to incite violence.

In three long sessions of counter interrogation the prosecutor Alina Hardak grilled Tatour again and again about many details from her publications, her interrogations in the police, other posts on her Facebook page and even comments by other people on her page. She tried to mislead Tatour, enter words to her mouth and find contradictions in her explanations – but couldn’t divert Tatour from her simple and sincere explanation of her publications.

You can read more about here in Mondoweiss (and in Hebrew here and here).

Eighth hearing, March 19, 2017 – Experts’ opinion for the defense

On March 19, 2017, the defense presented two expert witnesses, Professor Nissim Calderon and Dr. Yoni Mendel.

Professor Calderon, an expert in Hebrew literature, explained how the most famous Hebrew poets expressed furious protest under Tsarist Russia and the British Mandate in Palestine, and were never prosecuted by these undemocratic regimes like Tatour is now targeted by Israel.

Dr. Mendel presented his own translation to Hebrew of the “Resist” poem and explained how the police translation distorted its meaning.

They were both grilled in counter interrogation by the prosecutor, trying to prove that they were not objective, that Tatour was not a poet and that the Palestinians were not living under occupation.

This counter interrogation produced many surrealistic dialogues that were cited in many articles and some of it has even constituted the text of a short play that was shown in the Yaffa Theater in a solidarity event with Tatour on August 30, 2017.

You can read more about it in English (also here and here), in Spanish, in Hebrew (also here and here) and in Arabic.

Ninth hearing, March 28, 2017 – The defense claims discrimination in the enforcement of the law

On March 28 the defense brought as a witness a police officer, who presented to the court a statistical report about interrogations and indictments concerning incitement. The defense claimed that these statistics prove that the enforcement of the incitement law is one-sided against Arabs, ignoring severe Anti-Arab incitement by Jewish Israelis.

The defense rested its case, but then the prosecution surprised everybody with a request to present more evidence.

You can read about it here (and in Hebrew).

Tenth hearing, April 27, 2017 – The prosecution tries to use Tatour’s first lawyer against her

The trial of poet Dareen Tatour was resumed in Nazareth Magistrate's Court on Thursday, April 27, at 12:00, before Judge Adi Bambiliya.

In this hearing the last prosecution witness testified, after all defense witnesses were heard in March. The witness was a lawyer who advised Tatour on the first day of her detention, in October 2015. As Tatour mentioned his advice in her testimony, the prosecutor took the rare step to force the lawyer to testify for the prosecution in order to disproof Tatour’s words. In the court the lawyer, Hussam Mow’ed, didn’t remember any details from his meeting with Tatour, only how shocked he was at her situation after being dragged from bed to the police station at the middle of the night. Anyway, with this nonsense the prosecutor prolonged the trial and added another full month to Tatour’s house detention.This was the last hearing before the verdict. The judge gave each of the sides 45 days to prepare written summaries. She didn’t set a date for herself for giving the verdict, saying that she will set a date for the verdict only after she will have the summaries, “as they are likely to be delayed anyway”.

Detailed report in Hebrew about this hearing was published in Free Haifa and Local Call.

Dareen Tatour is still under strict house arrest. She is allowed to go out of her house only for 2 hours a day, from 17:00 till 19:00. At any time, at home and while going out, she should be accompanied by one of the “guardians” – her parents, two brothers and a sister in law – who deposited and signed big bail sums and will pay them to the court in case that Tatour will access the internet.


Dareen Tatour Legal Aid